Florida State University’s Dr. Gregory Erickson working with a team of scientists from the University of Calgary and the American Museum of Natural History recently released a surprising discovery they made after examining fossilized dinosaur embryos. By determining the age of the embryos upon measuring embryonic teeth rings (which are similar to measuring tree rings to find a tree’s age), they discovered that dinosaurs were more reptilian in their incubation periods, not ornithoid (birdlike).protoceratops_bw-under-creative-commons-license

This study was the first time scientists discovered dinosaur embryos actually had teeth rings like those found in modern mammals and reptiles. The teeth rings supplied an accurate measurement for the age in days for a Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (duck-billed) and a Protoceratops andrewsi (dinosaur with frills). It helped the scientists conclude that dinosaurs had a slow incubation period lasting much longer than a birdlike animal should, which served to debunk their theory dinosaurs were more like birds. In fact, the incubation period was similar to that of reptiles. Dinosaurs, like reptiles, also laid 20-30 eggs at one time as opposed to laying a small numbers of eggs with short incubation periods as birds do.

Given all of the results from their data, it means that dinosaurs were most likely cold-blooded reptilian animals, not warm-blooded ornithoid animals as evolutionists have assumed over the years. That makes it highly unlikely that dinosaurs would have morphed into birds, as many evolution scientists have fooled themselves into thinking. Thus, the scenario laid out in the Bible–that everything was created after its kind and reproduces after its kind–is most likely the most accurate account of what actually happened. Nevertheless, as data continues to pile up refuting the dinosaurs-to-birds theory, it’s doubtful those who believe in such fairy tales will give them up despite the science since ultimately their assumptions are not really about the science.

To find out more details about this study, read:

Dinosaur Eggs Not Bird-Like After All by Tim Clarey, Ph.D., Institute for Creation Research, February 13, 2017.

Advertisements