used under Creative Commons license
used under Creative Commons license

If a dog bites you once, shame on the dog, but if it bites you again, shame on you. So the saying goes. Despite that sage advice, there are many politicians like President Barack Obama and corporations like Monsanto who want us to trust their word as they promote the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) even though they’ve bitten us in the past with their policies.

With Wikileaks’ release of the Intellectual Property chapter of the TPP and other leaks, many truths about the closed door deal have come to light and most of it isn’t good. As a matter of fact, it has the potential of putting a death grip on the aspirations of having genuine free markets, national sovereignty, and freedom of expression. Here are some of its harmful aspects:

  • Under Section E for patents, subsections A (Patent filing) and B (Agricultural Chemical Products) would potentially allow a corporation such as Monsanto (see ¶21 of this link) and others who manufacture GMOs to game the system to force their GMOs on nations or regions even if those nations or regions resist via their jurisdictional courts and laws.
  • Under that same Section E, subsection C along with the Section H (Enforcement), Big Pharma companies (who have time and again shown they care more about money than human lives) are potentially given a lot more power to delay generics (see ¶9-10 of this link) from entering markets and to keep prices high on their drugs. This would favor the health of the rich, put the middle class in financial straits if they face an urgent situation that can’t wait for the cheaper drugs, and shuts out the poor from access altogether. This will in turn fuel the black market for pharmaceuticals, considering that no matter what agreements are passed as law, criminals tend to take advantage of lack of access to make money.
  • Section G (Copyrights) used with Section H would potentially give mainstream media outlets (whose viewer/subscriber numbers have been in freefall) to push against the free flow of information on the Internet by alternative outlets and could potentially allow elitists to stop whistleblowers from getting important information to the public about their misdeeds. It would also prevent the masses from making informed decisions.

These are just a few of many scenarios the TPP is orchestrating and could, if passed and put into effect by the nations involved, be the greatest leap toward one world governance since either the founding of the United Nations or the founding of the EU. There’s definitely the devil in these details.

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