Bible · Christianity · faith · God · Holy Spirit · Jesus Christ · Old Testament · religion · Trinity

Is the Trinity in the Old Testament?

The idea of the God of the Bible being a Trinity (from the words tri-, meaning three, and -unus, meaning one, to render the meaning “three in one”) is a concept ridiculed and rejected by Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons, “Oneness” (Jesus Only, Apostolic) Pentecostals, Unitarians, et al. Critics claim the idea of God as three in one was conjured up by overzealous Christians and was injected into the New Testament (NT), but is completely absent from the Old Testament (OT).

A close look shows that the idea of God as three persons in one is prominent in the Old Testament even though the word “Trinity” isn’t there. Critics may say the Bible has been tampered with, but this is nothing but a false accusation that has never been  and can never be proven since it isn’t true.

God made physical appearances in the Old Testament in the form of his son, the Lord Jesus, as I pointed out in past posts,  and we see the Trinity as ever active, ever present in earthly events. Here are some examples:

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. Genesis 1:1-2 (In this passage introducing us to God, the Hebrew word for “God” is “elohim,” as I’ve explained before and it means “gods,” yet it is also singular, denoting one entity. Unbelieving Jews know this, but deny it. We see two members of the Godhead mentioned here.)

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Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. I will declare the decree: the Lord hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee. Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession. Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.

10 Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. 11 Serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice with trembling. 12 Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him. Psalm 2 (The Lord says he has a begotten son, which means he comes directly from God, which makes him equal with God because he is God.)

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The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool… The Lord hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek. Psalm 110: 1, 4 (Jehovah, the Father, spoke to Adonai, the Son, and gave him the seat at the right hand side of God’s throne in heaven and called him a priest with no beginning and no end, like Melchizedek.)

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The words of Agur the son of Jakeh, even the prophecy: the man spake unto Ithiel, even unto Ithiel and Ucal, …Who hath ascended up into heaven, or descended? who hath gathered the wind in his fists? who hath bound the waters in a garment? who hath established all the ends of the earth? what is his name, and what is his son’s name, if thou canst tell? Proverbs 30: 1, 4 (Agur prophesies about God’s power and ability and acknowledges prophetically that God has a Son.)

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10 But they rebelled, and vexed his holy Spirit: therefore he was turned to be their enemy, and he fought against them. 11 Then he remembered the days of old, Moses, and his people, saying, Where is he that brought them up out of the sea with the shepherd of his flock? where is he that put his holy Spirit within him? Isaiah 63

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And the Spirit of the Lord fell upon me, and said unto me, Speak; Thus saith the Lord; Thus have ye said, O house of Israel: for I know the things that come into your mind, every one of them… 24 Afterwards the spirit took me up, and brought me in a vision by the Spirit of God into Chaldea, to them of the captivity… Ezekiel 11 (The Holy Spirit conversed with Ezekiel and took him to different places in a vision. He is called “the spirit of God,” “the spirit of the Lord,” and the “holy Spirit” in the Old Testament. If you do an OT search, you will see him showing up in a lot of passages.)

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Look closely in the word and you will clearly see, from eternity to eternity, God shall forever be the holy Trinity.

Harry A. Gaylord

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3 thoughts on “Is the Trinity in the Old Testament?

  1. ONE-Echad God, who has Created, Walked among us and as His Spirit is in an upon us- 3 different manifestations from the beginning and all through the Old Testiment. Not 3 seperate persons.

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    1. How did you know that its 3 manifestations and not 3 persons? Can you back it up with Scriptures?

      On the baptism account of Jesus, I’m pretty sure there are 3 that are present. Where was the Father? Where was the Son? Where was the Holy Spirit?

      And who was Jesus praying to in the Garden of Gethsemane? To Himself? “Not My will, but Yours”. Otherwise He would’ve said, “My will be done”.

      By the way, Ec-had is unified ONE, not singular one. From the context in the Hebrew language, if you ask a Hebrew scholar, this is unified ONE, not singular one. Because ‘God’, in Hebrew language is Elohim. Did you know the word Elohim is plural? “Elohim” is a name, or designation of God. In Creation account, the Scripture would say, In the beginning Elohim created the heavens and the earth. – In pentateuch, Elohim is used more often. That’s why He would say, Let ‘US’ create man in ‘OUR’ image. We are created in the image of Elohim.

      Plural, yet still considered ONE… I’m not saying I’ve figured or comprehended the three persons of God. No one can…

      If you’re thinking of quoting Deut 6:4, you better think again, Sh’ma, Yisra’el! Adonai Eloheinu, Adonai echad Hear, Isra’el! Adonai our God, Adonai —

      Adonai is plural from the word ‘Adon’ – meaning “my lord”. Ec-Had to this context, means unified/unity. Unfortunately, in the English language, it is difficult to articulate in such manner. If only the English Bibles allowed themselves to use ‘Elohim’ and ‘Adonai’, and know their meaning, it would make better sense.

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