Supporters who lobbied fiercely for the enforcement of medical marijuana use in Illinois were disappointed on Tues., November 30, when the Illinois House defeated the bill. The measure needed 60 votes for passage, but only got 53 votes in favor of it and 59 votes against.

With permission from a doctor and a license required for the patient from the Illinois Dept. of Public Health along with a few other controlling factors, the bill was supposedly set up for those with “chronic pain.” The sponsor of the bill, Rep. Lou Lang, a Democrat from Skokie, IL, claimed that if it had become law, many patients who suffered in pain even after several prescriptions from doctors would have been able to buy marijuana to improve their “quality of life” by easing their pain.

Opponents to the measure, such as Rep. Ron Stephens, a Republican and pharmacist from Troy, IL, argued that the bill lacked a number of regulations to keep marijuana usage under strict control.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn, a Democrat, had promised to sign the bill into law if it had passed. Rep. Lang pulled the bill after the vote to hold it over for any future vote that may come about when more lawmakers are favorable to it.

In a state known for its corrupt politics, it’s great to see that there are some who still have sense enough to foresee the dangers of legalizing pot, which is just a stepping stone to legalize all illegal narcotics.

Narcotics fall under the category of sorcery because they have always been one of the main tools used by sorcerers from ancient times to today. Revelation 9:21 says that in the last days, people will be given to sorceries, the Greek word pharmakeia, from which we get our word pharmaceuticals. So it’s no surprise there is a worldwide move to make such drugs legal.

–posted by Harry A. Gaylord–

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