Is America going to pot?

cannabis_leafSince California legalized the use of medical marijuana in 1996, 12 other states have followed in its footsteps.  Some lawmakers in the state of Illinois are now hoping to be added to that number.  Although it passed a law in the 1970s legalizing medical marijuana, the law was ignored and never enforced, but that may soon change, if some members of the Illinois House get their way.  An Illinois House committee recently voted to bring the issue before the whole Illinois House for a vote.

I’m sure the advocates for the legalization of marijuana are wringing their hands in glee, hoping for another victory.  Those who back the idea of legalization often use the Netherlands as their prime example of how things should be in the United States.  What they often forget to mention is that the sell and use of cannabis in the Netherlands which is sold in the coffee shops there is technically illegal, the law is just not enforced.  They also conveniently don’t mention that in recent years, problems have arisen in the Netherlands with the sell and use of cannabis that have caused the government to rethink their policies and a large number of the cannabis coffee shops have been closed down while the government decides how to make changes they deem necessary.

There have been problems with drug tourism when potheads coming in from other countries get high and harass some of the local citizens.  These drug tourists have also been attempting to smuggle their stash of drugs out of the Netherlands into countries where it is illegal.  So much for the utopia that pot smokers want us to believe the Netherlands are.

Germany, where smoking cannabis is popular, has seen an increase in problems caused by marijuana.  With the Netherlands bordering on Germany, it is easy for potheads (who are mostly younger) to cross the border into the Netherlands to get high.  Experts who monitor drug use in Germany say cannabis users are starting at increasingly younger ages.  It was estimated in 2006 that  approximately 400,000 Germans were psychologically addicted to the drug or are heavy users.   A greater number of young people who use marijuana are experiencing heart palpitations, sudden sweating, and anxiety/panic attacks.  There have also been a larger number of marijuana smokers visiting drug clinics complaining of being burned out or severely depressed.

Modern day cannabis has been cultivated to yield contents of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the ingredient that gives it its kick, up to 20-25% whereas marijuana plants back in the hippie days rarely had more than 10% THC content.  In Bremen, Germany, the Brain Research Institute has shown in its studies that cannabis use during puberty can lead to long-term damage like lack of motivation and disturbances in memory.  Research at the Central Institute of Mental Health, also in Germany, has revealed that smoking pot can cause schizophrenia.

And if there’s still any doubt about the harmful effects of using marijuana, the Oct. 1, 2008 issue of the journal Sleep revealed a clear link between insomnia and the use of cannabis or alcohol and harder drugs in teens and young adults.  This insomnia tied to cannabis use also showed an increase in depression and suicidal tendencies in these teens and young adults.

bong1Some states, like California and Arizona, that have legalized medical marijuana have experienced an increase in criminal offenses involving the drug in recent years.  They have also witnessed their national parks being used by Mexican drug cartels as pot farms.  The legalization of medical marijuana is just a stepping stone to legalize all marijuana use, and ultimately, all illegal drugs.  It encourages a mentality among potheads that says, “If patients can use marijuana for their problems, I should be able to legally use it too.”  Thus legalization of medical marijuana drives the demand for the typical use of marijuana, to get stoned, which often leads to demand for harder drugs.  And it’s this heightened desire and demand in the U.S. that has furiously fueled the Mexican drug war.

In the end, arguments in favor of marijuana legalization such as its regulation would reduce sales or usage, or that it would dry up the underground market, or that drug arrests are racist, or that information against using pot is wrong, or that drug enforcement is too costly, are all unreliable arguments.  Legalization of pot will not end the black market it fuels any more than the laws and regulations upholding our movie, music, and fashion industries have ended the billions of dollars in pirating and knock-offs of those lucrative industries. Should we legalize slavery again because human trafficking has shown dramatic increases and also generates a lot of money on the black market?

The tendency to use the failure of Prohibition against alcohol isn’t much of an argument either.  Once Prohibition ended, we inherited a whole host of other problems like drunk driving injuries and deaths, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, underage drinking, and binge drinking.  Did legalization of prostitution really benefit Nevada as they claimed it would?  All it did was help crime rates increase in Las Vegas and helped increase human trafficking in the U.S.  Likewise, pot legalization will only do more harm.

The use of drugs to get high is simply, as I’ve said in a previous post, the sin of sorcery mentioned in the Bible.  They were used in ancient times by pagans who wanted to enter an altered state of consciousness to contact their devilish spirit guides or gods and are still used for the same reasons today.   It’s Satan’s subtle way of unleashing more of his evil angels to affect mankind’s decisions for his own evil purposes.  In my opinion, all this fuss about the benefits of legalizing pot isn’t worth the nickel bags that marijuana users were smoking when they thought it up.

–posted by Harry A. Gaylord–

Sources: Crime in Arizona Reports, State of Arizona, Dept. of Public Safety

California Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Statistics Center

Dutch Coffee Shops Close as Authorities Weed out Drug Tourists, Deutsche Welle, 29.04.2007

Netherlands: Efficiency of Drugs Policy Under Scrutiny, Global Legal Monitor, Law Library, Library of Congress, March 2, 2008

Soft Drugs With Hard Consequences, Deutsche Welle, 14.05.2006

Adolescent Insomnia Linked To Depression And Substance Abuse During Adolescence And Young Adulthood, ScienceDaily, October 5, 2008

14 thoughts on “Is America going to pot?

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  1. Ok your logic, reasoning and evidence is all flawed. I am not even going to get into the silly religious arguments you state since they support the legalization movement more than condemn it (freedom of religion and all that) so lets start with your evidence.

    You claims that marijuana causes schizophrenia is not quite true. There have been studies which demonstrate that people who have schizophrenia have used marijuana in a higher percentage then the average population. The studies however do not cite causality. One such study even outright states that it is entirely within the realm of likely hood that schizophrenia causes the desire to try drugs in order to quell the symptoms before diagnosis.

    As for the Netherlands, well lets see all of the problems have to do with drug tourists, not the actual citizens or the laws themselves. This tells me it is how the process is carried out and the fact that there are no actual regulations on the books. So is the Netherlands system flawed, yes, does this mean legalization can’t work, no because the Netherlands CAN’T be used as an example of legalization in action.

    As for your claims about adolescents, well duh kids should be doing drugs. This is not an argument against marijuana legalization. Several surveys over the years has demonstrated how kids have a much easier time getting marijuana then alcohol. To me that suggests legalization and regulation is the more logical route since prohibition is obviously not working.

    “Once Prohibition ended, we inherited a whole host of other problems like drunk driving injuries and deaths, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, underage drinking, and binge drinking”
    Are you honestly claiming these crimes didn’t occur while prohibition was in effect?

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  2. Today’s high stimulant marijuana worsens in the long-term all of the medical conditions it is being prescribed for. When law liability websites start noting the impacts of it on Hepatitis C, look out.

    And the depression/lethal suicide risk that you noted, originating in the devastation of serotonin by the good stuff, is a growing issue for the ill (e.g. Aids, 2008).

    But who could imagine that not even the evidence out of Harvard Med. (2008 August) that low-dose THC poses a multiple risk of Kaposi’s Sarcoma in immune patients could break the media silence?

    If toxic brain impacts were found in early cig smokers what network would not be covering it (North Am. Rad. Soc. 05,08)?

    And today’s high stimulant marijuana is indeed a powerful gateway to heroin and other opiates. In reality, there has been American evidence since 1987 that THC primes the brain for opioid involvement. Not even compelling evidence of that relationship derived from autopsy of human fetal brain whose mothers used cannabis (Wang &C. 2006) could overcome the barriers.

    Consider that research involving 42 mid-gestational abortions in New York City and challenge your readers: if the mothers were using nicotine or alcohol in pregnancy, what major media would have failed to cover it?

    There is a lot of interesting material for someone like yourself in this domain of high-THC marijuana studies. One being that it is in large part the drive for the rush among the now-dominant group of under-aroused, physically depressed users that leads from marijuana to injection drug use. To get the rush, danger must constantly increase. As heroin users I have known professionally since they originally took bong hits of good bud constantly say:”weed is so boring”. Still, they continue a secondary relationship with marijuana because of addiction to it; they just never mention it, or think about it.

    Ultimately this is about making the world safe for the emerging oligarchs. It also is a unique example of how truth can be totally squashed when politics, science and information centers come together. Sadly, it is only a precursor.

    Marijuana has long been known in the research world to enable under-employed adults to detach from disappointment (e.g. Hendin 1987). And it completes the marginalization of those rising non-academic kids least likely to make it into the lifeboats in a techno storm not yet half over (e.g. Melbourne. 2007). Marijuana plays a mean head game with them, first normalzing their life-long struggles with insomnia and other conditions; then worsening all of them as they cross the threshold of dependence.

    Soros and colleagues know what they want. What they don’t realize is that in the seventh decade ahead, the “Great Victor” they are long certain is in their control will turn on their successors in an era of post-war Reconstruction and take away all their wealth and power.

    America was once a land of truth-telling.Christians in America, wake up.
    respectfully, don smyth

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  3. [There have been studies which demonstrate that people who have schizophrenia have used marijuana in a higher percentage then the average population. The studies however do not cite causality.]

    This comment, 420 guy, is rather vague. Which studies are you talking about? The study I mentioned in my post out of Germany does, in fact, cite causality. People who had exhibited normal behavior started exhibiting abnormal behavior after they started habitually using marijuana.

    [So is the Netherlands system flawed, yes, does this mean legalization can’t work, no because the Netherlands CAN’T be used as an example of legalization in action.]

    If the Netherlands can’t be used as an example, then why is it that so many who favor legalization use it constantly? It’s the only nation that comes closest to legalization, so what you’re really saying is that no valid example of a nation really exists to prove that legalization really works. In essence, you have in a roundabout way agreed with one of my points.

    [Several surveys over the years has demonstrated how kids have a much easier time getting marijuana then alcohol.]

    Again, I ask what surveys? I was specific with my information, so if you have counterpoints for what I’ve presented, maybe you should cite which sources you’re talking about.

    Surveys aren’t always accurate since they have to rely on truthfulness from those being asked the questions. At best, underaged drinkers have an easier time getting alcohol because they know people old enough to buy it for them who are willing to buy it for them, including their parents who want to be considered “cool” or the parents of their friends. At worst, kids have just as easy a time getting cannabis as they do getting alcohol.

    [Are you honestly claiming these crimes (drunk driving, etc.) didn’t occur while prohibition was in effect?]

    No. I’m saying they got much worse after Prohibition. That’s not to say I’m in favor of Prohibition, because we do have responsible drinkers. I’m just making the point that Prohibition didn’t lessen crime as many had hoped it would, just like legalizing pot won’t lessen crime.

    420 guy, I think that if you lay off the pot for awhile, you might find yourself thinking more clearly. Just some friendly advice from someone who cares and has seen firsthand the negative effects of smoking cannabis.

    And Don, thanks for your comments.

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  4. Actually the German study did not find causality, it took 39, I believe, schizophrenic patients some who had used marijuana and some who had not it also took 39 non schizophrenic controls some who had used and some who had not and compared them. yes the marijuana using schizophrenics performed worse than the non users, but this should be no shock. Someone with a serious mental condition should not use drugs not prescribed to them. However the study completely lacks any causality, it does demonstrate that use of canabis can make schizophrenia worse, but not cause. A British study (Boydell J, et al. Schizophr Res 2007 Apr 24) took this German study to task over this in fact. Boydell et al. took a much larger group and compared marijuana using schizophrenics and non marijuana using schizophrenics and found no decipherable difference.

    As for the Netherlands comment, I did indeed agree with you that it cannot be used as evidence pro legalization, but I disagree on your assertion that it can be used as an argument anti legalization. Basically the Netherlands is an example of how NOT to do it.

    As for the surveys on alcohol vs pot, I can certainly cite your sources and will. I will however first address your claims. Just because you think its easier to get alcohol then pot doesn’t mean it is so. I know when I was in highschool I knew of three people who actively dealt hash oil, and knew of at least five others who I could get marijuana joints from easily. And for the record while in highschool I was not part of the drug culture in any way, I avoided marijuana and was very against it, and yet I still had at least eight contacts I could have used to get marijuana. Alcohol I could get from two reliable sources. Now for the survey citation:
    Columbia University’s Centre on Addiction and Substance Abuse: http://www.casacolumbia.org/articlefiles/380-2008%20Teen%20Survey%20Report.pdf

    Drunk driving and such got worse after prohibition? Care to cite sources on that, and bear in mind that during prohibition drunk driving wasn’t what you’d get charged with but drinking in general. Prohibition saw a significant rise in alcohol related crimes and violence was out of control. The same is happening with Marijuana but we pretend its the fault of Marijuana instead of the fact that we allow criminals to be in charge of the weed instead of the government.

    I too have seen the negative effects of marijuana abuse, the difference is I can see the line between abuse and use. Marijuana is many times less dangerous than alcohol and tobacco, yet both those are legal. Marijuana is not physically addictive, Alcohol, tobacco, and caffine are all considerably more addictive and harmful to the system.Nor are there any documented long term effects to casual use, unlike almost every other us silly humans have the ability to abuse. I think its you who needs to think clearly harry, not I. Try reading the facts once and a while.

    Don:
    The gateway drug theory is a joke and has been debunked repeatedly. If you really require it to be debunked again I can go into considerable detail on the failings of the theory, but I suspect you already know the flaws but deliberately turn a blind eye to them.

    As for the Kaposi’s Sarcoma link, yes this needs to be researched further, but even with this the side effects of marijuana are considerably less then the side effects of almost any other pain management drug or anti nausiant drug that is currently available.

    And you keep on referencing High dose marijuana, this is another myth. The fact is all studies on the strength of THC are flawed in that they test a sample group that is too small to be of any use. During the 70’s weak marijuana from mexico flooded the markets, this does not mean you couldn’t get more potent stuff, it just meant the weaker stuff was cheaper. Also users tend to smoke only as much as they need, and it is nearly impossible to overdose on marijuana. Plus the fact there is ZERO evidence that higher dose THC = more risk.

    Should marijuana be kept away from kids? YES, most definitely. Is prohibition doing this? NO, without a doubt prohibition of marijuana has failed.

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  5. We can go back and forth all day everyday until the world ends about what study shows what. For instance, there was a German study done in 2005 of 2400 young people in Germany showing that “exposure to cannabis during adolescence and young adulthood increases the risk of psychotic symptoms later in life’. Further, it found that ‘this association is stronger for individuals with predisposition for psychosis and stronger for the more severe psychotic outcomes’.” C. Henquet, L. Krabbendam, J. Spauwen, C. Kaplan, R. Lieb, H. Wittchen and J. van Os, “Prospective cohort study of cannabis use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms in young people”, British Medical Journal, 330, January 2005, p. 13.

    This study was cited and quoted in the study entitled “Does cannabis use lead to mental-health problems?: findings from the research” completed in June 2007 at this link– http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/RN/2006-07/07rn21.htm

    The study concluded that “evidence reviewed above suggests that cannabis use is associated with the development of mental disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. However, there is ongoing debate over exactly how this association should be characterised. In brief, it appears that while the majority of cannabis users will not develop mental illnesses as a consequence of their cannabis use, …there is good evidence that young people and heavy users are particularly at risk.”

    Those who have done studies often point out that more studies need to be done to draw more concrete conclusions. But does that mean we can go ahead and overlook the obvious results of how people act when they’re high? I don’t need a study to tell me that it’s difficult to have a normal, intelligent conversation with a regular person when they’re high as opposed to when they’re not. I don’t need a study to see that their motor skills and reflexes are compromised when those skills and reflexes should be normal. Could you have even made your comments above after you got high?

    Argue all you want in favor of legalization and how marijuana is less harmful than this or that legal substance, but that does not take away the fact marijuana is still harmful. Tokers, stoners, potheads (whatever you want to call them), like their alcoholic counterparts, often get behind the wheel of a vehicle and do bodily harm to themselves and others.

    Haven’t you ever seen or heard about parents who are so busy getting high on marijuana that they neglect their babies and young children? Child and Family Services Departments all over the country are chock full of such cases.

    And just think how much more people could have accomplished if they had never started on marijuana. Elvis Presley, Jimi Hendrix, and Jim Morrison would have probably lived longer and penned more hits.

    As far as the Netherlands are concerned, maybe it wasn’t just the drug tourists causing problems. I’ve watched and read the news long enough to know that those who report may not have the whole story or may leave out portions for whatever reason. The bottom line is that the Netherlands situation proves that legalizing marijuana doesn’t work.

    If we were to legalize it, we’ll have a greater problem at our borders with a greater influx of people trying to get in from Canada and Mexico to do something illegal in their own countries with the legal crops they would get here. We have a legal pharmaceutical industry with laws and regulations, but still there is a billion dollar underground industry of pharmaceuticals here and abroad. Such will be the case with cannabis.

    I think we have enough history to show that when you legalize sin or evil, more sin follows.

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  6. Harry, We are all victims of the corporate propaganda machine that owns the mass media and big pharma. All of your “truths”/”facts” come from tainted information designed to scare you. It has worked.

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  7. freebird,

    I’m not a victim of any propaganda machine. No one can make me believe anything I don’t want to. It’s amusing you would bring up “big pharma” as if they’re the ones against legalization. Aren’t you aware that if marijuana is legalized, it’s the big pharma companies who will gain the most from that legalization? They’re the ones who will own corporate farms to grow the plants and sell the product. You and big pharma are playing on the same team.

    What’s tainted are people who walk around like zombies with their brains on drugs. The studies showing all the harmful effects of reefer that I mentioned in this post are on to something.

    I gave examples of how legalizing industries doesn’t eliminate underground markets as you people claim. I’ve given the movie, fashion, music, prostitution, and pharma industries as examples. Here’s one more–the GAMBLING industry (or “gaming” as politicians want to call it to make it sound as innocent as Milton Bradley).
    We have legalized gambling all over the U.S., but underground gambling is still rampant and is a multi-million dollar or more industry.

    Legalizing cannabis will yield the same results.

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  8. Ahh, I see, you are referencing a completely different study. The one you are referencing is stating that use in Adolescents can cause psychological disorders, well yes we should keep kids away from drugs. Guess what prohibition is NOT doing it. And even in that study the causal link was extremely weak.

    “I don’t need a study to tell me that it’s difficult to have a normal, intelligent conversation with a regular person when they’re high as opposed to when they’re not. I don’t need a study to see that their motor skills and reflexes are compromised when those skills and reflexes should be normal. Could you have even made your comments above after you got high?”
    Of course the conversation is different with someone who is high and motor skills and reflexes are compromised. I am not trying to claim anything otherwise. however the effects of alcohol are much more dramatic and much harder to gage. As for intelligent thought while high I could list a number of very intelligent people who came up with some of their best thoughts while high. Carl Sagan comes to mind.

    “And just think how much more people could have accomplished if they had never started on marijuana. Elvis Presley, Jimmy Hendrix, and Jim Morrison would have probably lived longer and penned more hits.”
    There is zero evidence that Elvis used marijuana, he abused prescription drugs heavily though. Jim Morrison’s drugs of choice were heroin and cocaine. Jimmy Hendrix died from prescription sleeping pills. Marijuana had nothing to do with the death of any of these men. At best this is a straw man argument, at worst its absolute BS.

    “I think we have enough history to show that when you legalize sin or evil, more sin follows.”
    You have utterly failed to demonstrate how marijuana is evil, and I know for a fact you can’t come up with a single biblical reference to claim that use of marijuana is a sin.

    ‘Here’s one more–the GAMBLING industry (or “gaming” as politicians want to call it to make it sound as innocent as Milton Bradley).
    We have legalized gambling all over the U.S., but underground gambling is still rampant and is a multi-million dollar or more industry.’
    This is not evidence that legalization makes things worse, this is an example of poor legislation and banning things in one place while legalizing it in others.

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  9. The reason I mentioned Elvis, Jimi Hendrix, and Jim Morrison were because they all started with pot. In case you didn’t know, it’s a gateway drug that often leads people to use harder drugs. If they had not tried marijuana, they wouldn’t have moved to the other drugs that led to their demise.

    The causal link between marijuana and mental disorders is still being studied and there is some disagreement among those studying it, but that doesn’t mean the causal link doesn’t exist. Sometimes it takes a while for research to draw concrete conclusions. Cigarette smoking was studied for decades before a causal link was definitively established to lung cancer and other illnesses.

    As for Carl Sagan, he was known to make errors when discussing or writing about his scientific theories and opinions. He was probably high when he made the errors. I bet if he had stayed away from weed, he would have caught the errors before he made them.

    Your legislation argument brings up an excellent point. If our legislators can’t seem to get things right regarding gambling and other industries, do you really think they’ll get legalizing weed correct?

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  10. High dose marijuana? 420 guy, I would be pleased to arrange through harry here citations
    you can follow up on particularly the 2006/08 United Nations Drug Agency reports, along with two international monographs, that document how, country by country, pot, and cannabis sativa have been replaced by stimulant buds, higher THC levels and hybrid varieties. Still on a practical basis, I would like to have had you with me in Arcata, CA last March at a “therapy dispensary” on the main street. Only hybrid buds were on sale, and the pitch was for “Brainwreck, Trainwreck and AK 47”.

    Here’s a memory bank quote from 2001. I was in a series of home visits, a comfortable home certainly, with a 19 year old with childhood trauma, social phobia and learning problems.
    He related the experience of AK-47: “It’s like a bulldozer ripping through your head.” If that seems momentary, it can be placed in perspective by looking at stroke risk (e.g. Stroke 91; Pediatrics. 2004), brain blood flow reversals and
    ischemia impacts.

    A newspaper columnist who wrote about my perspectives last May was savaged in an editorial by senior staff who like ‘pot’ and promote it ceaselessly.

    They clearly liked ridiculing me for a quote she used based again on a home visit. It illustrates the disdain for pot/weed that is out there in the real world: “Mom, we don’t smoke the leaves, we throw the leaves out. We just smoke the buds.”

    This was a highly troubled 14 year old trying to explain to one of his pot-era moms the realities of bongs and buds and more immediately what he and one of his friends were doing with home grown plants cultivated at the friend’s house.

    A California reader wrote a letter to the editor, praising them for dismissing her concerns about mental health and marijuana. Yet, he closed by suggesting they were wrong on one count: no one smokes the leaves today, he said.

    You both might find of interest a document that I have provided to a number of governors and several hundred state legislators titled Betraying the Vulnerable that contains the evidence around depression, lethal suicide, psychosis, asthma death, stroke risk, MS and resolves the issues of cause and association on the mental health front. I would be pleased to e-mail it to you and certainly would respect your criticism of it. Since the last update, I see further evidence of my suggestion that ultimately depression and lethal suicide will outweigh the psychosis issue world wide.

    For now, before anyone really gets too certain that there is no mental health causality here for early starters, I do urge you to read in full the reports of related toxic brain impacts out of Long Island Jewish Healthcare System/North Shore University Hospital (See Radiological Society of North America, 2007 also 2005).

    Also, for one of three full accounts of how THC creates psychotic reactions seen and assessed by medical scientists who did not anticipate what they found after administering THC (a range of doses) involving mentally healthy human subjects, see: D. Cyril D’Souza. Proc. 2nd Annual Ment Hlth Conf on Cannabis. Kings College May 2007.

    For a sobering, sad report tracking long-term follow-up outcomes with individuals in Denmark who first presented at hospitals for cannabis psychosis, see: Mikkel Arendt and c. 2005. British J. of Psychiatry.

    Ultimately, this all ties in with changes/ increases in cannabinoid receptors that occurs with regular use. (e.g. Dean, B. and c. 2001. Changes in density of cannabinoid receptors associated with schizophrenia and cannabis use).

    If you look at the recent journal article, media covered, on testicular cancer, you will find the same issue — same phenomenon being identified around risk for Hepatitis C patients, pancreatitis and impacts on the brain’s memory centers.

    The earliest evidence on schizophrenia concerns came from Sweden and 50K conscripts in the Sixties. Their form of cannabis was hash not pot. Personally or professionally, I never saw mental health issues with old-style pot, but I saw impacts, motives for use and consequences around hash and hash oil all along. Then I spent a decade in a city building a comprehensive drug program (yes, the beloved “say no” First Lady was a visitor) where Middle Eastern hash was the only form of cannabis. Nothing prepared me for the reality that within a few years, hybrids based on indica Middle East/Afghan hash plants would emerge and then dominate here.

    In that environment dominated by a strong form of cannabis,I began to see the development of mental health issues (as well as the onset of MS in one compelling instance) in hash users. Now, I am haunted by the irreparable harms this “innocuous” substance has brought to the lives of five young adults all with promising futures and good values. But my efforts derive from a promise to three young adults five years ago. They were riddled, undeservedly, by guilt around the death of a senior peer who died from an asthma attack while they were doing bong hits together. They are fine individuals, but I would be saying the same thing whether they consume or don’t consume cannabis today.

    I have always opposed criminalizing people for drug involvement; this is not about legalization or prohibition, it is about truth-telling and reversing a drug war against the most vulnerable of our young people. They are not freely choosing to use, they are being led to do so by a relentless campaign that assures them the “only harm is getting caught (May. 2005; LA Times).

    Thanks for your tolerance of me.

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  11. Satan is a pimp and a drug pusher and his aim is to get as many hooked on something to keep their minds foggy and off of God and His Word. Any disagreement with this statement is one that agrees with Satan.:O)

    TL11

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  12. I just wanted to add another comment to 420 Guy’s comment:

    “You have utterly failed to demonstrate how marijuana is evil, and I know for a fact you can’t come up with a single biblical reference to claim that use of marijuana is a sin.”

    “Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:” 1 Peter 5:8

    If a substance is not coming from our Father God, it most certainly is coming from the devil.

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    1. “If a substance is not coming from our Father God, it most certainly is coming from the devil.”

      Tasha, you seem to be forgetting this verse:

      And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit; you shall have them for food.”
      —Genesis 1:29 (RSV)

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      1. Daniel, you forgot that after Genesis 1 came Genesis 3:17 which says, “And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life.”

        After God cursed the ground, up came briers, tares, thistles, thorns, and other weeds which are mentioned throughout the Bible as being signs of evil, wickedness, and destruction (see Isaiah 5:6, Ezekiel 2:6, Matthew 13:38, and Hebrews 6:8).

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